Houston Aeros 1994-2013: Thank you for all the great memories and two decades of great hockey and entertainment.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Moderation Is Now On

Okay, we tried to play nice. We laid out commenting rules to be followed last week. And we think we've still had a pretty good free flow of information, comments, etc. But we've had some nasty stuff posted tonight, and every time we deleted the comment -- as we said we would -- it was reposted. And since none of us wanted to stay up all night handling this matter, we've turned on the moderation feature.

If this works properly, that means that nothing goes up in the comments until one of us approves it. Sorry, but somebody decided to abuse the commenting privilege. We're having a group meeting this weekend and we'll discuss how to handle this, but for now, it's moderation. And I apologize.

18 comments:

AeroFinn said...

Well at least the "buttons" still work without moderation :-) ?

p.s. I'm just being cranky on your behalf for having to stay up late

AeroFinn said...

Maybe create a "comment posting account", have it first approved by the moderators? I think that would cut down on the "abusers"? There can't have been that many to start with?

Ok and the verification word is "pally"....no kidding let's all try to be pally here

alw02 said...

The instant nature of the post is a valuable attribute to the poster. I would suggest to go ahead and post them with frequent review and deletion of offending posts.

AeroFinn said...

I agree with alw02 that the "instant nature" is important. But I wouldn't mind logging in to leave a comment. This would already be an extra level of moderation. If somebody would still continue to leave abusive messages it would be very easy for you guys to start giving msconducts/disable that particular registered person from leaving any more messages. Don't know what happened last night, but I don't think that the situation with improper messages has been that bad?

artandhockey said...

Feel free to 'moderate' any of mine ...I am going to be a good "sport" (word for this) about it ;) and 'pally' right along AeroFinn.

John Royal said...

The instant nature of the post is important. But someone kept reposting a comment that we deleted multiple times -- and it was deleted for legal reasons. If moderation was left off, and we went to sleep, which is what we wanted to, and the comment went up there, WE could get in legal trouble if we let it stay up, if even for a few hours, before deleting it.

Google doesn't give many options that I can see -- at least not when I'm tired and want to go bed -- for dealing with comments. But we're looking at different options.

Ms. Conduct said...

Approval's going to happen pretty fast during the day. I know it's less satisfying and it sucks for us to have to babysit the comments as 99% of them are perfectly fine but you know what they say about rotten apples.

And yeah, there really aren't many options for controlling (without moderating) comments in Blogger. But I'm sure we'll find a better solution than moderating.

CatTrick said...

I strongly agree that the instant nature of comments is a valuable attribute to the poster. I hate that comments will now be moderated but respect the T3I team's decision. I'm sure it was made with forethought. A few guilty parties have censored the rest of us, as is often the case.

For what it's worth, I dislike the idea of a comment posting account. I think it would interfere with spontaneity and discourage people from making and reading comments.

AeroFinn said...

Don't want to sound nasty here but I forgot that I'm in USA. Everybody sues everybody for the tiniest thing? Coming from Europe it is quite hard to believe that you could get sued for something that was posted on the comment section of your blog. Then again I remember reading about that lady (in Chicago I think it was?)getting sued for criticizing her landlord on twitter. That is America for you? Wasn't this suppose to be the land of the free? What about freedom of speech? Freedom of expression....
Sorry I believe you when you say that it can be so, but just very hard to get that you can get sued for these comments here... I think I will have to think twice before starting my own blog. Or maybe I could base it somewhere in the Bahamas and escape the US jurisdiction?

John Royal said...

AeroFinn, two comments:

A. Check out my post over at the Houston Press or on the CVC -- as pure coincidence, I wrote about the First Amendment in regards to athletes -- it fits in here. The First Amendment prevents the government from punishing someone for their speech. That doesn't mean that a private entity can't punish you.


B. Defamation is not legally protected speech under the First Amendment. And the thought was the comments were borderline defamatory. And for what it's worth, the U.S. is the best country in the world, legally, when it comes to defamation law. As much I love Europe, the countries over there are much more draconian when it comes to defamatory speech.

AeroFinn said...

Could be bit of an European prejudice on my part there then?
America does not have a very good rep in Europe when it comes to lawsuits. I think quite a lot of people believe that everybody is suing everybody here:
Microwave oven manufacturers getting sued for not mentioning that one should not dry their cat in the microwave etc. Might be an urban legend that one though?
And what about the "industry" in Alabama of suing Northern companies? Judges and the jury just divide the money? Does that really exist? Then again nothing to do with freedom of speech these ones I guess...Could my comment be classified as defamatory? Should I be expecting to hear from Alabama?

Ms. Conduct said...

I have no idea what you're on about there AF, but I'll keep an eye on the stats and if I see a bunch of hits from Alabama, I'll let you know and you can take cautionary measures. :)

CatTrick said...

I'm hiding my cats from everyone with a microwave!!!

AeroFinn said...

Martin Fletcher in "Almost Heaven-Travels through the Backwoods of America" mentions Lowndes County in Alabama:

[...Some impoverished citizen finds a pretext to file a lawsuit against a giant manufacturer or insurance company, prefarably from the Yankee north. The plaintiff's lawyer uses his twelve vetoes to obtain a jury of similarly dowtrodden citizens...] [...He plays on their deep-seated sense of grievance, of having been exploited for too long, and invites them to teach the offending company a lesson. The jurors happily comply, awarding the plaintiff not just compensation but some astronomical sum in punitive damages...] [...Between 1989 and 1996 juries in Lowndes County had in this way enriched their peers by a staggering $155 million...]

Ms. Conduct said...

Interesting! Never heard of that situation. Pretty clever. Roll tide! ;)

artandhockey said...

AeroFinn is right.
There are counties in Southern states where suits against BIG money/companies always get a winning outcome.
And a definite yes, Europeans do believe that in the USA everyone sues everyone over the slightest thing.
Sorry, but that's how they feel over there, among other things, such as regulations, political correctness.
apropos 'sickness' is today's word :), too bad, eh?

Forecheck said...

I think I need to develop a deep-seated sense of grievance myself....

Snikpip said...

Ms. C! Oh no you didn't!! Now I have to sing "Rocky Top" for 30 minutes just to disinfect my mind after reading your "Roll Tide". Damn! There goes another 30 minutes. :)